Oran Mor

A Play, a Pie and a Pint

“What’s not to enjoy?”
THE HERALD

A Play, a Pie and a Pint


So what is a Play, a Pie and a Pint all about?

read more»
Seen a Play? Win Whisky!

Photos

  • Skeleton Wumman 1

    Skeleton Wumman 1

  • Skeleton Wumman 2

    Skeleton Wumman 2

  • Skeleton Wumman 3

    Skeleton Wumman 3

  • The Last Bloom 1

    The Last Bloom 1

  • The Last Bloom 3

    The Last Bloom 3

  • The Last Bloom 2

    The Last Bloom 2

  • A Perfect Stroke 1

    A Perfect Stroke 1

  • A Perfect Stoke 3

    A Perfect Stoke 3

  • A Perfect Stoke 2

    A Perfect Stoke 2

  • Love With a Capital 'L' 3

    Love With a Capital 'L' 3

  • Wind in the Pines: Rehearsals and Interview

    Wind in the Pines: Rehearsals and Interview

  • Interview: Marilyn Imrie

    Interview: Marilyn Imrie

  • Patrick Harkins Interview

    Patrick Harkins Interview

  • James Ley Interview

    James Ley Interview

  • Interview with Graeme Maley

    Interview with Graeme Maley

  • Interview: Rob Drummond

    Interview: Rob Drummond

  • Interview with Martin McCardie

    Interview with Martin McCardie

  • Interview with David Ireland

    Interview with David Ireland

  • Helen Kluger Interview

    Helen Kluger Interview

  • Michael Marra Interview

    Michael Marra Interview

  • Oliver Emanuel Interview

    Oliver Emanuel Interview

  • In Conversation: Mike Gonzalez

    In Conversation: Mike Gonzalez

  • Marianella Yanes Interview

    Marianella Yanes Interview

  • Alan Bissett

    Alan Bissett

  • Interview with Davey Anderson

    Interview with Davey Anderson

  • Abigail Docherty Interview

    Abigail Docherty Interview

  • Interview with Lewis Hetherington

    Interview with Lewis Hetherington

  • Morna Pearson Interview

    Morna Pearson Interview

  • Nicola McCartney: In Conversation

    Nicola McCartney: In Conversation

  • Kieran Lynn Interview

    Kieran Lynn Interview

Latest comments

peter griffin

said about: Critics' Circle

Gerda Stevenson has cleverly put some dramatic meat on the bones of Skeleton Wumman her reworking of an old folk tale. In doing so she has created a peach of a lead role superbly played by Amy Conachan. Amy gets splendid support from Buchan Lennon who also acts as a signer for the deaf. The ethereal music from Seylan Baxter's electric cello is the icing on the cake.


Stuart Hillhouse

said about: Between the Thinks Bubble and the Speech Balloon

A surprisingly pleasant introduction to the Play, Pie, Pint phenomenon for my better half and me. Between the Thinks Bubble and the Speech Balloon was, for me, an interesting and entertaining story of Mark struggling to decide how to approach his creative writing course. His analysis of four unconnected characters only brings him more confusion about how he should approach his style. The performance produced some amusingly comedic moments and some serious social comment. It managed to say a lot in only fifty minutes. So much so I can’t wait for the next production on the roster.


Richard Ross

said about: Doras Dùinte (Closed Door)

Chunnaic mi Doras Duinte ann an Inbhir Nis. Bha e uamhasach math !


Dee

said about: Spring / Summer 2014 Season Announced

I'm thinking about a season ticket but will I be guaranteed a seat at every play?


Cora Fenton

said about: Fred & Alice

Fred & Alice are very excited about going to Glasgow


steelgraham

said about: Fishwrap

1st time for me since school. LOVED IT. - Will come back. Graham


Matthew Swan

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

The Uglies - brilliant


admin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Hi Liz. Unfortunately, this does mean that the tickets have completely sold out online. All of our performances, apart from Friday 6th at 12pm, have sold out online. However, we always have a limited allocation of tickets to sell on the door, on the day of the performance. The doors open at 12pm (11am on double performance days). I would suggest arriving as early as possible for the best chance of tickets. PPP team


Liz Mac

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

tried booking on-line for 2 tickets Thursday 5th or Monday 9th and it wouldn't allow me. Are they sold out or can I obtain on another site - wouldn't like to miss it this year.


admin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Hi Rachel. The tickets are only available to collect on the day of the performance. If you have pre-booked, these tickets will be available to collect from our front of house manager, just at the top of the stairs as you head down to the venue (not from the box office in the foyer area). PPP Team


rachael

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

i have bought tickets for the 19th. is it possible to pick them up from box office week/days before then?


charlie mcgurk

said about: Video Interview: Jenny Knotts

Jenny, Fabulous to hear of your success. Have to say I'm not surprised! Congratulations


Jess Miller

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

For a new playwright Jenny Knotts crafted a play about aging and dementia that should not have been funny, but it was. I laughed and didn't feel guilty. I relived the sadness and empathy and frustration of caring for a loved one. The acting was great and the inclusion of the audience just felt right. I'm here visiting my sister and her husband I just wish I had an Oran Mor at home. Thank you all so much


Ian McSeveny

said about: Home

Into two women's orderly life old age and confusion enters - frailty, senility, Alzheimer's - and reason leaves. The idea of support changes its nature. Agnes sees Maggie's dangerous unpredictable behaviour, inability to cope, and concludes a rational course of action - for the family - for the future. One last evening at home. (Mammy would have understood). But perceptive and anxious through the rush of unwelcome evidence of a home being taken from her, Maggie also decides. She is not going alone - and lights and leaves one last cigarette. The strings of life about to crack. Powerful finale!


admin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Hi Marty. Yes, we offer quiche as a vegetarian option. We hope that you, and your girlfriend, enjoy the show! PPP Team


Marty

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Will there be any veggie pies available? I have a girlfriend of that most inconvenient calling :)


admin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Hi Derry. All advance tickets must be purchased through ticketweb.co.uk 08444 771 000. We only sell tickets on the door on the day of the performance at the Oran Mor box office. PPP Team


Derry Martin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Can I buy tickets for the pantomime at the box office in advance of any date?


admin

said about: Òran Mór Panto: The Uglies

Hi Moira. As usual, we do always keep a limited allocation of tickets to sell on the door on the day of the performance, first come first served. If you can try and arrive as early as possible, there will be a chance to get tickets. On Saturday's, the box office opens at 11am, with a 12pm and 2pm performance. PPP Team.


Chris

said about: Home

Can't wait to see this show next week! Promises to be amazing.


Peter Kelly

said about: Janis Joplin: Full Tilt

I neglected to mention the excellent direction by Cora Bissett. Sometimes brilliant direction means you don't notice it in performance. I cite that as my only reason for omitting to mention it in my earlier comments.


Peter Kelly

said about: Janis Joplin: Full Tilt

Can't believe mine is the first comment with just one performance left. For sure word of mouth must be working. It was really busy (possibly sold out?) at Friday's show and the audience was amply rewarded. Angie Darcy was convincing in every aspect, switching effortlessly from 'Pearl' the iconic raunchy singing legend persona to the private Janis with her fragile outsider bluster and addictive personality. Peter Arnott's script deserves special praise for its economy, humour and pathos. I found it quite incredible that so much music and story could be delivered so effectively in less than an hour. Finally, it would be remiss to close without praising the quality of the musical backing provided by the four piece band. This is the most best lunchtime experience I have enjoyed. Grab a ticket for the last performance ... If you can get one.


Graham Clarke

said about: The Deficit Show

Best political theatre that I have seen in years. Great accomplished and versatile cast of performers and writers. They deserve to be widely known and the Defecit show was another timely reminder of the state we are in and a call to do something about it. Funny, rousing, sad and poignant by turns. Brilliant stuff!


ian foyer

said about: Grave Undertaking - Critics' Circle Wiiner

Just had to say,.. 2nd time i've left with tears in my eyes, last week tears of sadness - this week tears of anger (of a good variety )ya buggers.. keep up the good work. thanks to all at the (give us)Mor !!


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Mark I'm afraid that there are no more shows scheduled for Saturday 14th December. All of the advance tickets for that day have sold out online. We do always keep a small allocation of tickets to sell on the door on the day of the performance. If you are planning on coming along on the day, I would suggest getting here as early as possible for the best chance of getting tickets. The box office will open at 11am on Sat 14th December and there are performances at 12pm and 2pm. PPP Team


Mark Mc

said about: About / Ticket Information

I know there are two performance on the Sat 14th Dec but will there be any more ? Go every year with friends but sold out :-(


L-J Nolan

said about: Grave Undertaking

A Grave Undertaking is a witty cross-section through the emotions of life, marriage and death. It follows the story of an undertaker, aptly named Jim McCaber. We watch him meticulously preserve the memories of the loved ones of his mourning customers, until he is unexpectedly reunited with a cadaver, and ghost from his past. This play made me laugh and cry, a macabre cabaret of a man whose living existence is examined and retold through the very corpses he preserves. Leaving the audience affected and amused, but most of all, with a renewed sense of carpe diem.


Mr Campbell

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, I was wondering where play submissions should be sent for the lunchtime plays event next spring for African & Caribbean Writers. I understand that this is a collaboration between the National Theatre of Scotland & Oran Mor, and is being overseen by Susannah Armitage. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Regards, Mr Campbell


alastair mcfarlane

said about: Video Interview - The Jazz Club Murder

All that jazz so superbly sung and magnificently played would have been great entertainment by itself! Throw in the murder mystery then and we find a truly unique event and even more fascinating show-piece. James Runcie's writing was crisp, superbly developed the theme in the very best tension-building manner. The cast operated as a real team giving of their all to make this a distinctly different theatrical variation


alastair mcfarlane

said about: **** Four Stars for The Great Train Race

Admittedly on a few occasions you wondered whether things had gone a little "off the rails" but the trio's brilliant acting of a totally challenging and highly amusing script brought us back "on the right lines" again! Having the audience divided in supporting their favourite line was a superb theatrical initiative What a terrific signal box Joyce Falconer made with her wonderful Torry tongue while Ian Robertson and Grant o' Rourke's multi-character interpretation was Scotland's best piece of theatre for many a month It was certainly "full steam ahead" with many fascinating historical "points" en route!


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Ann Marie. Tickets are available from www.ticketweb.co.uk at any time. Tickets can only be purchased from the box office at Oran Mor on the door on the day of the performance, on a first come first served basis. The box office opens at 12pm (12.30pm Mondays) and the show starts at 1pm. PPP Team


Ann Marie Murray

said about: About / Ticket Information

Can you advise me what time the booking office closes Monday - Friday please.


Graham Vahey

said about: Divided

Thought I'd see this play, to see what actors portrayed of my one time friend and colleague, Ronnie Laing. Thought well, they won't get the essential Ronnie as I knew him. However, I found myself very moved by Billy Mac's portrayal. Ronnie influenced me a great deal, especially as I took over some of his patients when he went to London to train as a psychoanalytical psychotherapist. I then did my psychoanalytical training here in Scotland and found later that his famous 'patient' ( not a term I use) Mary Barnes, came to see me in Fitzroy Place and we worked together on a project she brought. The daughters portrayed in the play accurately showed how troubled Ronnie failed in his personal life. At a book signing in Glasgow I found folk laughing at him as he was drunk. I took him home, for to me, he was a pioneer in psychotherapy and light years ahead of everyone else at the time.


Linda Keenan

said about: Trouble and Shame

Excellent production. Well worth going to see. Lots of laughs with a hint of sadness


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Lorna. If you are pre-booking at ticketweb.co.uk then a booking fee will apply. If you are waiting until the day and want to get tickets at the Oran Mor box office, then there will not be a booking fee. However, these tickets are on a first come first served basis so we would suggest arriving early to avoid disappointment (box office opens at midday). PPP Team


Lorna

said about: About / Ticket Information

If I buy my tickets at the box office will I still have to pay a booking fee?


Ian Turbitt

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

This is the first year I have been to Oran Mor's Play a Pie and a Pint and I am already hooked. I am a retired professional puppeteer and worked in a very minimal way at various venues all over Scotland for 20 years, so the skill required in creating a whole world in a small performance space is something I admire and immediately recognise. My favourite play this season was Chekov's Three Sisters. With only three actresses and one actor all playing individual instruments, fiddle, accordion as inter-scene musi, the company of four populated the performance area with around nine individual characters, switching character by the donning of a hat or a coat and locations by the mere turning of a chest or suitcase. In one stunning moment an actress played a highly convincing fearsome bully of a soldier by her change of voice and the wearing of military boots. The whole show exhibited for me the true Art of the Theatre.


Cardross Kate

said about: Summer Panto: A Bit of a Dick Whittington

Just wanted to congratulate everyone in the Summer Pantomime for another fabulous performance - packed full of laughter, wit and first-class acting! Thoroughly enjoyable! Not to be missed!


Martin E

said about: Summer Panto: A Bit of a Dick Whittington

Very, very funny. If this is typical of the standards at Oran Mor I will be back - soon! Good beer and unpretentious (but great) food. Thanks for a thoroughly enjoyable afternoon.


Dee

said about: About / Ticket Information

My boy is 15 and I'm wondering if he is too young to be permitted into play pie and a pint? I would love to take him to one this week.


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi JennieRae We don't have any designated parking. There is some street parking on Byres Road and Great Western Road, or alternatively there is a pay and display car park behind Hillhead Underground and at Kelvinbridge Underground. PPP team


JennieRae Paker

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi there. What is the parking situation? Is there parking available or will we need to drive around a while to find something? Thanks, JennieRae San Jose, CA


admin

said about: Summer Panto: A Bit of a Dick Whittington

Hi Lorraine. We don't specify that Children are not permitted, however, the Pantomime is intended for an adult audience and there will be some language used that you may not think suitable, and some adult content. PPP Team


lorraine

said about: Summer Panto: A Bit of a Dick Whittington

just checking is D Whittington for children and if so what age gruop? regarsds lor


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Ian. We missed this off the most recent list, Jim Dickson was the winner for Dalgety. See the winning review here http://playpiepint.com/?p=5517 PPP Team


Ian M

said about: About / Ticket Information

As a once a month attender I often try for the CC Malt... but no news of the Winner for Dalgety?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Ashton We don't specify that Children are not permitted, however, the Pantomime is intended for an adult audience and there will be some language used that you may not think suitable, and some adult content. PPP Team


admin

said about: Classic Cuts: The Changeling

Hi Apologies for the trouble you have been having booking tickets. You should be able to get them via ticketweb.co.uk, but you can also contact ticketweb by telephone on 08444 771 000. I hope that this has been helpful. PPP Team


payal debroy

said about: Classic Cuts: The Changeling

unable to use website to book tickets - been trying for 3 days! can i book over the phone??


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Louise Script submissions for a Play, a Pie and a Pint. At a Play, a Pie and a Pint we constantly endeavor to present the best of new writing in Scotland and are always looking to add new voices to our stage. We therefore accept unsolicited scripts that adhere to our guidelines of 45-50mins in length and which can be presented with no more than three actors. Scripts must be submitted electronically and can be emailed to playpiepint@oran-mor.co.uk. However, please bear in mind that we operate with a small core team and receive a very high volume of scripts so it is not always possible for us to respond to all submissions in as timely a fashion as we would like. Please bear with us and feel free to send a follow up email if you have received no response after 6 months.


Ashton

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, I am interested in coming to your summer panto but are children welcome? sutibule for a 4 year old?


Louise

said about: About / Ticket Information

Do you look at new plays by unknown writers? I've a play I've written that I would love to be considered for PPP. Thanks


jim dickson

said about: About / Ticket Information

The names of the critic circle winners seems to be lagging behind .Is there any mini season tickets for the next 5 productions


jimmy (james) cairney

said about: Ann Marie di Mambro

Anyone know how I can contact "professor" De Mambro? I was in one of her plays in 1987 and I'd love to let her know how much I remember it and how it influenced my life


Tom D

said about: Marco Pantani -The Pirate

Truly absorbing account of such a dark,troubled,flawed genius. Superb writing allowing informative incite to all three characters within the confines of a 45 minute play. Felt exhausted and exhilarated by accounts of magnificent stage and tour victories. While tackling the tragic life of a sporting icon this wonderful play cleverly, light heartedly recognises the now well documented arrogance and skullduggery of Monsuier Armstrong and the lengths he went to physically and psychologically to beat The Pirate. Must see play for all cycling,sport enthusiasts but equally moving human life tale for all audience.


Kyria.Sherwin@btinternet.com

said about: Marco Pantani -The Pirate

I have just been to see this play and cannot believe that 45 minutes could have been so moving. The writing and acting were excellent to the point that I am still trying to go about my afternoon without reflecting on the tradgedy and triumph of Marco Pantani's life. I was in Paris for 1998 and went totally native for the 'Tour' that year. The distinctive figure of Marco Pantani was ever present and I followed too his subsequent decline. I cannot thank the author and actors enough for such an honest and absorbing portayal of a singular man. Kyria Sherwin


Rosemary Blumenthal

said about: TICKETWEB

Hi, 3 USA & 1 Scot ladies visiting Glasgow 17th to 20th of July inclusive would like to book tickets for ppp. How do we do this by internet. Want to show off the people's culture.Love the thought of this. Could we have good seats as we are all over 75. Rosi


peter griffin

said about: Sweet Silver Song of the Lark

Molly Taylor's homage to being a Liverpool fan is a delight, no mean actor herself she also had in Benny Young and Michael Ryan the thespian equivalents of a Dalgleish and a Gerrard. Ryan's 'Istanbul' soliloquay was genuinely moving and surely a candidate for best performance in the current ppp season.The sweet silver song of the lark is a play well worth walking on through the rain to see.


Paul Fawcett

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, are most plays sold out or is it ok to take a chance on the day, we was thinking of monday the 8th of April Thanks Paul


isobel mcfarlane

said about: Driving Manuel

Manuel dominates Scotland's world of murder. This was a reality. The brilliant set; the highlighting in the darkest sense...of the action and inter-action gives further dimension to this deeply disturbing, confusing and totally chilling tale. Denise Mina shows her real skills making the characters present facts and interpretations in a "never a dull second" way, gaining audience involvement and participation. Our Scots actors give of the all; the accolade of any dramatic performance is surely a belief in the characters. We were there; we were horrified; we witnessed a superb piece of Scottish theatre


jim dickson

said about: About / Ticket Information

Re The appeal last year to celebrate the 250tplay by hoping to get 250 people to donate 100£ For a venue which draws most of its audience from what is regarded as an affluent area the responce was effluent. 3


Lorraine

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Is there a Pie, Pint and a Panto planned for June orJuly this year?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Alex. Student rates are not available online. Student tickets are available from the box office on the day of the performance (box office opens 12.30pm on Mondays, and 12.00pm on Tuesday). Please bring a valid Student Card. PPP Team


Alex

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, I couldn't seems to be able to buy student tickets online, I could only buy standard fares online it seems. Where could I buy student tickets online?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Kim - The play is will be on at Oran Mor from Monday 11th - Saturday 16th March, and then at the Traverse theatre in Edinburgh from 19th - 23rd March. The play is called 'The Commission' and the winner is Steven Dick. To pre-book tickets for Oran Mor contact ticketweb.co.uk . Please visit traverse.co.uk for Traverse tickets.


Kim Strachan

said about: About / Ticket Information

Is the comedy winning play (Comedy Drama Award 7th Jan)still scheduled to be shown on 19-23 March, please? What is the winner called and current availability for the 19th, please?


June Bone

said about: A Respectable Widow Takes to Vulgarity

This play is so much more than a titillating look at a posh widow learning to swear. The slow build relationship between the unlikely pairing of Annabelle and Jim is so poignant and yet realistically convincing. The two may appear to be polar opposites and yet they ultimately develop a friendship that makes both the better for it. I loved everything about this wee treasure of a play; the dialogue, the minimalist staging and the crafted performances from Scott Fletcher and Joanna Tope were all truly superb.


donald thomson

said about: A Respectable Widow Takes to Vulgarity

This was a joy of a wee play - taking the widow ( Joanna Tope) now unshackled from normal life, due to her husband's death, and exposing her to alternative shop floor language from one of the business's employees ( Scott Fletcher ). As she played and toyed withn the (conventionally) foul language, like a child finding a new toy, the results were hilarious. This scenario would be cringe-making in the wrong hands, but Douglas Maxwell's scriping gives all the right weight and space to the dialogue which is excellently handled by the two actors. Loved it.


Catriona

said about: About / Ticket Information

Is it OK to bring a newborn baby along to a performance?


jim dickson

said about: About / Ticket Information

Whats the latest about the scroll


admin

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hi Alida. That should be you added to the mailing list now. The Season has been announced, all the listings can be found at the What's On section of the website. PPP Team


admin

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hi Joan Our Spring Summer Season has now been announced. Please check out the What's On section for full details. PPP Team


Joan Scott

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Do you yet know what will be on at lunchtime on sat 2nd feb. Regards Joan


Jacqueline Cornes

said about: About / Ticket Information

I am very keen to see your programme for "A Play and Pie and a Pint" prior to 28 Jan 2013, when will your website be updated? Also how much is the booking fee?


Jacqueline Cornes

said about: About / Ticket Information

Where can I get a list of the upcoming plays commencing 28/1/13?


Rosemary

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Can you tell me if Lesley Hart's play 3 Seconds will be on at Oran Mor in February? Thanks


David MacDonald

said about: About / Ticket Information

Are kids allowed to see Aladdin. We are pretty open minded parents.


John Gilmour

said about: Please Mister (with video interview)

Mr Patrick Harkins 'A Writer' 'A Gentleman' ' A Friend ' God Bless, from all yer pals in Rothesay........


Michael

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, Do you have anything on after Christmas on the 28th,29th December? If so when I can I buy tickets.


chris

said about: Terms and Conditions

Trouble trying to get tickets for the show on 17th from the ticketweb site. Are 3 tickets still available?


admin

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hi - Which day were you looking for. A few of the performances have sold out the pre-sale allocation. If you are having trouble with the website, try contacting ticketweb on 08444 771 000


IBT

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hello, I was wondering whether there are any tickets for the panto, the webticket service doesn't seem to work. Thanks a lot


C Paxton

said about: Spring 2013 Season

What can I say except fabulous as good as any you see on a big stage and loved the Glasgow humour. First time at this venue and I'll certainly be back in fact I'm looking to see if tickets are available for next week for this show.


Diane, Milngavie

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Cat stole the show! You will have to watch that 'lad' from straying. Fabulous show, sang all the way home - keep it coming.


admin

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Dave Anderson, Juliet Cadzow, George Drennan and Cat Grozier


Linda Conn

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Can you give me the names of all the cast of this years panto please. Can't find this info on web site. Thanks


Graham

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Just got back from the panto. Excellent, keep them coming


Leszek

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hello, I was wondering, whether there were any tickets left for teh "Christmas Panto: Aladdin and Wee Jeannie, as it is not possible to buy tickets for this event via ticketweb. We are arriving from abroad and would love to see the play. Thank You in advance for Your reply. Kind regards,


Hugh Boyd

said about: Dig

“Take Me If You Need Me” is this week’s Oran Mor’s lunchtime play, written by 10 writers and wonderfully played by three actors – Isabelle Joss, Iain Robertson and Mark Wood. It was a simple tale of love, lost love, sex, family, money, power, personal integrity and social class in half a dozen fast changing scenarios! It was a bit confusing. My neighbours right and left asked me “What was that about?” Well, the writers were students of television writing, so it’s episodic and they are young and so they try to solve all the problems of the world. Simple.


Duncan Comrie

said about: Critics' Circle Winners

OM 26.11.12 Take Me If You Need Me or a day in the life of a ten pound note: found, given or stolen, it spends itself ten times, each with an emotional kiss-punch. It played out like a graphic novel mixed with spice of mime: Its black & white caricatures added melodrama & pathos to a stage where extremes meet. This contradictory, raw and yet sophisticated, example of theatre was a surprise.


J.

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

First visit to A Play, a Pie and a Pint. This "play" lasted no more than 30 minutes, was humorous, not funny and had no depth to it at all. More like a skit and very disappointing. For £12.50 - a rip off.


hamish

said about: About / Ticket Information

I have heard about you from various friends. Will do my best to make the pilgrimage from Rothesay


cissie

said about: About / Ticket Information

do you sell gift vouchers for pie and pint plays


Sandie Gordon

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Today my husband and I and two of our friends saw Loyalty and Operation Phantom Fury. We all very much enjoyed the plays and the performances by the actors. Harry Ward & Daniel Boyd were both excellent but special praise must go to Michael Nardone whose performance in a thought provoking play was indeed outstanding. A big well done to all involved. Great day out. Sandie Gordon


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Graham. No you will not have to queue to pick up the tickets. You will be given your ticket from the front of house manager just as you head down the stairs, at the point where you would usually just show your ticket. PPP Team


Graham

said about: About / Ticket Information

I have purchased 6 tickets for the panto through Ticketweb and have now been informed that I have to pick them up on the day of the performance. Will this entail queueing up with all the people waiting to purchase tickets for that day or, is there some other arrangement whereby we can collect our tickets?


admin

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hi Clem. after the Panto finishes on the 23rd, PPP won't start up again until the new year, start of February time. Oran Mor will be open though if you fancied coming in for a festive Dram! PPP Team


Clem

said about: Spring 2013 Season

Hello, I was wondering if you were also open after boxing day ? thanks.


admin

said about: TICKETWEB

Ticketweb should be up and running, please follow this link to the Oran Mor page of the Ticketweb site http://www.ticketweb.co.uk/search.php?tm_link=tm_header_search&language=en-us&keyword=oran+mor


admin

said about: TICKETWEB

Hi Janine. Ticketweb is all up and running now. Please follow this link to the Oran Mor page where all panto tickets are on sale. http://www.ticketweb.co.uk/search.php?tm_link=tm_header_search&language=en-us&keyword=oran+mor PPP Team


Janine

said about: TICKETWEB

Knowing how popular the panto always is, I wanted to book early... How do I do that if ticketweb is still not updated?


Mary

said about: TICKETWEB

ticketweb inaccessible today 7 November 2012. Is the site still inaccessible? When will it be up again? Anywhere else tickets can be bought?


annie

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

came along today to see This Little Piggy, first time my friend and i had managed along..didnt know what to expect, thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience,will definately be back.


ALPH FORREST

said about: TICKETWEB

TRYING TO BOOK 4 TICKETS FOR THE 2PM PANTO MATINEE ON 5TH DECEMBER 2012. UNABLE TO ACCESS TICKETWEB TO BOOK, LOCATION BYRES ROAD .CAN YOU HELP?


Cannon

said about: TICKETWEB

Tickets still not available on ticket web. What other options can you provide for people to book?


annie

said about: TICKETWEB

trying to get tickets for play a pie and a pint. are they sold out? I was told no when I phoned however still unable to purchase on line through ticketweb only evening shows listed.


E Anderson

said about: Astonishing Archie

I am trying to book tickets for Astonishing Archie but the link doesn't seem to work?


Lynsey

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, When do the tickets for Aladdin & wee Jeannie go on sale on ticket web? Thanks


Veronica

said about: About / Ticket Information

Why can't I book tickets for Astonishing Archie? It doesn@t seem to be on Ticket Web.


Juergen Lange

said about: Jack Dickson

Here is a man hard to find. After reading his novels (or at least those I could get hold of) I have been looking for any kind of proof that Jack Dickson is a real person and not just some pen name of a much better known author. I just couldn't believe that somebody writing so brilliantly was only a face in the crowd. His literary works are very Scottish in the most positive sense. The stories are honest, strong, sometimes full of violence but always with a soft spot. You can't help yourself falling for his characters. And now his new play is being performed in Glasgow in the very venue I used to go when I was in town. How ironic! I wish I could simply hop across the channel and be there for the opening night. Unfortunately I can't. However, I strongly recommend to everyone to go see the play. Don't miss this opportunity if you have the chance.


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Celia If you ask the staff on the day the chef should be able to provide something for you, but please feel free to bring your own sandwich, under these circumstances we would have no problem with that. PPP Team


Celia

said about: About / Ticket Information

Do you have a Gluten Free option on the pie? If not, Would there be any objection to me bringing a sandwich for myself?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi. Yes, we can accommodate for wheelchair access. Please enter via the Brasserie Restaurant entrance on Great Western Road where there is a central lift which allows access to the whole building. PPP Team


Jill

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi ya is the venue suitable for wheelchair access?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Ros Yes, we do have a central lift which provides disabled access throughout the building. If you enter via the Brasserie Restaurant entrance on Great Western Road, you will be able to get the lift from there. PPP team


Ros

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi, is there disabled access ? I would like to bring my mother but she is not good with stairs.


admin

said about: Kieran Lynn

Hi Sarah, have passed on your message to Kieran. PPP Team


Sarah Hehir

said about: Kieran Lynn

Met kieron at the Nick Darke Awards. Just trying to get in touch. If there is any chance you can pass on my email to him, that would be great. Thanks!


adrianne foulds

said about: Critics' Circle Winner

Thanks for that - my first crit - and I win the whisky -Thanks to Oran Mor, Colin B. Dave McL and the whole gang - Play, Pie and Pint is brilliant - we try not to miss it and always enjoy! Adrianne Foulds


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Dear Jackie. Please let your mother know that she would certainly not be out of place at A Play A Pie and A Pint. We get a very varied age group, and with the plays being on in the afternoon, a lot of our audience are those lucky people who are retired and have the luxury of spending their afternoons watching some stimulating theatre, having a drink and a snack. Hope to see you and your mother here soon. PPP Team


jackie

said about: About / Ticket Information

I would like to bring my mother, who is in her 70's to a play, but she thinks she would be the oldest person there and feel out of place. What is the approx age range of audiences?


Val Aviss

said about: Critics' Circle Winner

Dear Oran Mor , I wrote last week of my disappointment at the first offering of the season - a slow and rather lame one hander. But what a difference this week . Another one hander but as different as chalk from cheese. The Room in the Elephant gripped from beginning to end and the actor really engaged with the audience and the variation tone of voice exemplified a major contrast with the rendition in Dead Famous. Well done ! Excellent ! Keep it up ! Ps. Had already bought season ticket David.


ignorant.bystander

said about: The Room in the Elephant

I was just entranced for the whole hour. An ingenious and moving script, and an acting tour de force. Big thanks to all involved.


Pat Devlin

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Was wondering where to take my friend who was visiting one afternoon and remembered Oran Mor done PPP, so decided as it was a horrible afternoon that it might be something different to do. The play was 'Alice in Poundland' and it was hilarious. Haven't laughed so much for ages, great way to spend an afternoon and the pie was delicious. We will be back. Thanks.


Janet Green

said about: About / Ticket Information

when will Elaine C Smith be performing?


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Angela. All 'A Play A Pie and A Pint' performances are at lunchtime. However, Oran Mor do sometimes have theatre performances in the same space in the evenings. Check out Oran Mor's 'What's On' section to keep up to date with everything that is happening in the Venue. www.oran-mor.co.uk/whats-on/ . PPP Team


Angela

said about: About / Ticket Information

Are events all at lunch time. Do you do anything starting early evening 1t about 6pm.


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Finlay. Yes, we will be showing extra performances at 3pm on Saturdays for our Christmas Panto, as well as other 3pm performances yet to be announced. Keep an eye on the website for more details. PPP Team.


Finlay

said about: About / Ticket Information

Will PP&P panto have a 3pm performance again on Saturdays this year?


Betty Hennessy

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

This was my first time at the play,pie and a pint, thought Alice in Poundland was wonderful, all 4 actors were first class. Well done. Look forward to going to see another play.


rose green

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

bravo or as we say in glasgow gaun yersel to the two daves who have brought fun and social awareness that touches the heart of glasgow audiences, who have grown older with 784 and wildcat.we are so lucky to have such a rich theatre tradition and oran mors prices make it available to all


admin

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Hi Kaite. Yes, the Summer Panto, Alice in Poundland is on this Friday at 3pm. Door for this performance open at 2.30pm. PPP Team


Katie usher

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Hi! Is the play, pie, pint on this Friday, 20th, at 3pm? Thanks


admin

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Hi Bryce. After Alice in Poundland finishes on 28th July, we will be taking a short break, returning on Monday 3rd September with our Autumn Season. Keep an eye on the website, Autumn Season info coming soon. PPP Team


Bryce Findlaay

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Could you let me know what will be on following the Alice in Poundland play.


Chester Studzinski

said about: Sol Summer Season of Classic Cuts: Private Lives

Private Lives is up there in with Turbo Folk and the Irish one about the funeral. There are so many superlatives it is difficult to know where to start. I will try, however.... Wonderfully directed and the fight scene was fantastic in thought and execution. The costumes were probably the best I have seen at Oranmor. Selina Boyack was fantastic as the sexy, sultry Amanda and James Mackenzie was brilliantly over the top as Victor. Outstanding support from Richard Conlon and Jennifer Hainey who is also to be congratulated on her brilliant adaptation. All in all, I fantastic break from the horrendous weather. It made me smile all afternoon.


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Sarah. The Season ends on July 28th. The Autumn Season opens on the 3rd of September. PPP Team


Sarah

said about: About / Ticket Information

Will you be doing any performances after July 28th?


Lisa Anderson

said about: Davey Anderson

I was wondering if you could tell me where i can find all of Davey Andersons plays. I have Blackout and i love it. Thanks Lisa


admin

said about: About / Ticket Information

Hi Gale. We do have a vegetarian option of quiche, and yes, all shows are unreserved seating. Hope to see you soon, PPP Team.


gale

said about: About / Ticket Information

have you got vege pies?are all shows seated


Scott MacBain

said about: The Brothers' Keeper

I don't often get to see my uncle perform but always love it when I get the chance. I thought this play was my favourite of all I've seen him involved in. It was a rollercoaster of emotions from the outset, touching on very serious personal situations before making you laugh till your face hurt! "I think I must be allergic to leather, everytime I wake up with my shoes on I've got a splitting headache!" Well done to all involved was a class act from start to finnish.


Thomas Flanagan

said about: The Brothers' Keeper

I attended the showing of the play yesterday, it was my first visit to the venue, it certainly wont be my last.The venue itself was first class, the intimacy of the auditorium enhanced what was an excellent pruduction. All four cast members were terrific, Dave Anderson whom stood in at short notice and performed with script in hand was superb, his improvisation and ad-libs were a joy watch. The play was poignant and everyone in our party of four could relate to the characters and their positions within a family structure. This was a wonderfull experience and one which I hope to repeat many times.


Hugh Boyd

said about: One Day in Spring

Oran Mor’s One Day in Spring series culminated with 24 Hours in the Middle East or How to Stage a Revolution in 18 Easy Lessons. An Arab-Scottish creation from many writers still living through the Arab Spring, these lessons were presented with emotion-stirring drama by Seif Abdelfattah and Sara Shaarawi who brought to us the complex emotions of being in an uprising - exhilaration, fear, violence, love, laughter, stress as violent reality strikes. Spontaneous youth-driven energy and electronic communication drive the protests. But for the Grace of God or Allah these revolutionaries could be my grandchildren.


Jezeille

said about: Arabian Nights

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW, the night of nights, David Maclennan hit the nail on the head when in the spur of the moment described the final of Arabian Nights as "This is the biggest Scottish Arab Ceiliedh of all times" or when he said, "if you put on something unusual in Glasgow on Tuesday night, everybody comes". Right enough, the place was fully packed, you could not have put your foot in. All of a sudden, a lively energetic surreal dance scene emerged where the same people who were sitting down stood up, joined hands and forgot themsleves dancing to Camille Nehme's lively dancey music. The music fell on everybody from every direction and side. I can only describe it with WOOOOOOOOOOW, it rings, bells and makes you think, laugh and shake from inside and outside. Enthused by an upbeat atmosphere, Alistair Gray, recited a poem in which he gave the night a further push into the unusual. The poem was perfectly rhymed and rhythmed to suit The Party Night. Ab Awji, the Lebanese story teller, told a story which made everybody laugh. For goodness sake, he's only been in Scotland for a few weeks and has already sussed us out. He is already talking about the only good thing in Edinburgh, ha ha, guess what it is? The train to Glasgow, but who blames him for saying that, as anybody who attends a night such as Arabian Nights in Glasgow will repeat his words, never mind a Lebanese man who probably felt at home on a night like this one immediately after his return from Edinbrugh. With the scene ascending, David Maclennan jumped up to the stage to tell a hilarious story himself, everybody enjoyed it. True, expect the unexpected at Oran Mor. Poetry in two languagesl read to sufi music? Who knows! I bet they can do with another dozen of similar nights without any hassle, surely nobody is going to complain. In the midst of it all I devoured the food and drink. Very grateful for the all the fun we really are.......


admin

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Hi - The line up this year is Dave Anderson, Juliet Cadzow, Catriona Grozier and Geroge Drennan. Unfortunately we don't offer group discount. Might I suggest coming along on a Wednesday - only £8 per ticket. Hope you can make it, PPP Team.


M Taylor

said about: Alice in Poundland - Summer Panto

Hello! I've had the pleasure of seeing a number of your productions over the years and I've never missed a single pantomime. Can you tell who will be in it this year? Also, do you discounts for group bookings? Planning on bringing a few friends. Hopefully see you on the 21st!


Nicola

said about: Arabian Nights

Have been... and seen deep David Greig interviewing Elieze from the Royal Court in London about her experience of collaborating with international playwrights who bring their world to us on a plate of our language! Heard a funny tale from a Lebanese story teller and playwright. Heard Camille Nehme's music which is rich and complex, also heard a guitarist and another violin like instrument. Saw the famous David Maclennan who seemed to hold the night together. Loved it all, next week is the last one and then Sharazad's head get chopped off... If you like drink, world music, poetry, theatre, food and politics, GO and chill


Charlie

said about: Arabian Nights

An intelligently woven night,smiles and laughter for the whole evening,informal dancing and applause, lovely food, very pleasant music played by Camille Nehme,a very interesting interview with the writer of Sleeping Beauty Insomnia Ab Reim Awji, a comedian like dramatist all the way from Beirut and poetry... I thoroughly enjoyed my 2 courses but above all, enjoyed the whole experience and the unpredectibility of the night. I went home needing more of the same, i.e. quality entertainment. Very interesting way of seeing another culture. My thanks go to everyone who was involved in making our night a pleasure


Gloria

said about: Damascus Aleppo

Amazing..... It deserves to run for years.


Kenny McCallum

said about: Dear Glasgow

As a regular drop-in-spur-of-the-moment regular!, I was disappointed in this production... four authors reading a letter from ?!?! who cares! It could have been Dear Edinburgh, Dear Stornoway, Dear Catmandoo... until now I have never needed to research what was going to be on stage in your prestigious, Play, Pie, Pint catalogue... now, I fear, I will have to look into each production prior to attendance and paying out my £25 for two... authors, in my opinion, ain't that good at reading out their own stuff, let alone this... they are not actors... it was a shame, as I had brought my mother along for her 82nd birthday treat... no play, no laughs, no comedy... the footware of the four was actually more interesting than the letters! please go back to your roots of real plays... your pies excel as usual... regards, Kenny


E W

said about: Arabian Nights

Fascinating female Arabic singer and belly dancer, arabic percussion, excellent live music, poetry and a story told by a famous playwright with delicious food.Best bargain in town. Wild night!


Paul

said about: Arabian Nights

You have said it all above but here is a bit more. "Arabian Nights" shrewdly brings something very new to Scotland. Best deal in town I would think. I met and heard an extremely sophisticated bunch of gifted people at once. Camille Nehme an amazing musician who brings the sounds, pulse, rhythms and beats of Arabia and skillfully pours them at Oran Mor in Glasgow. Poet Laureate Liz Lochhead who arguably is the best living Scottish poet; a strong woman who speaks truth to power. Alan Bissett, a poet with sharp talent who I could listen to for hours without getting bored. David Maclennan who I don't know how to describe, may be producer and theatre director but above all, very professional interesting and entertaining, someone you would like to have around in a party. "Arabian Nights" is a very special night.


sylvia w

said about: Arabian Nights

Unusal but smashing, don't miss it, mind stimulating night but gets your bottom and belly dancing! Go for it... my advice is to get up to make the best out of it. Have a jolly time. Cheers


Mary

said about: Arabian Nights

Does anyone have photographs or videos from Arabian Nights? TA Mary


June

said about: Arabian Nights

I agree ... Grub was good too.music was sexy!!!


Tom

said about: Arabian Nights

A night to be remembered. Music played by talented musician Camille Nehme kicked off the dancing from the start and set a joyful upbeat tone for the rest of the night with the bonus of traditional Middle Eastern tunes which got most of the audience to dance. To top it all up, Liz Lochead, Scotland's National Poet and poet Alan Bissett unravelled the situation in the Arab world through the letters of their Arab colleague poets who are living the Arab Spring. Liz, as we have always known her, was witty and outspoken. She spoke about the artist, writer, poet and everyone's responsibility to stand up for the truth. Liz and Alan did not forget to emphasise the importance of hope in the Arab Spring. This was followed by Darwish's poem on mothers which was very touchy. Nothing but the usual GREAT ATMOSPHERE at Oran Mor


Katrina Innes

said about: Arabian Nights

Multiculturalism shines through Arabian Nights. Vibrant night, get your ticket while there are some. It is a night that is not aware of how great it is.


janet

said about: Arabian Nights

I recommend Arabian Nights, I feel that I want to go to all the nights so that I don't miss any of Sharazad's stories! I feel that Arabian Nights started only to continue. Wonderful music made my soul dance although I am not to fit to get up. I may go again for that alone


George

said about: Arabian Nights

Fantastic night


Martin and Rachel

said about: Arabian Nights

Arabian Night with a flavour of the theatre, journalism, and music from another world. David Maclennan makes you feel at home when he is involved in a any piece of work... a fresh breeze. David Greig is the theatre on two legs, David Prat provided deep analysis of the tidal changes in the Arab world. Kamil Namiy passionately played music that is out of this world and managed to take everybody far every time he played his enchanting music. Food was great. Brilliant time!!!!!!!!!!!!! Brilliant food and company. We would come again to an event like this one. Very near but very differnt from what you would expect. Glasgow and indeed Scotland needs events like this one.


Richard

said about: Arabian Nights

The food is great, the atmosphere is relaxed. The talks are groundbreaking. The music that Kamiel Naimy played is exotic and takes you to the narrow alleys, belly dancing and spirituality of the Middle East, all in the same moments. We are priviledged for being able to see an Arabian Night in Glasgow. Well done Oran Mor.


vicky

said about: Arabian Nights

Talks are very interesting and relevant to todays world, the music is fascinating


Joe

said about: Arabian Nights

great event, loved the music and talks


Joe

said about: Arabian Nights

Arabian Nights is a wonderful event, music is great, you instantly feel that you want to get up and dance.


wilma stark

said about: News from New York

that is just wonderful Gerda. so happy for you and the play and also for Scottish Writing in general. you paint a wonderful picture of New York. thank tou for sharing. I loved the play when I saw it in Oran Mor and the live sax playin just superb!!!


Marie Melly

said about: Cold Turkey at Nana’s

Excellent play so enjoyable. Humour and a clear and present message how life has changed for Nanas. The love is still there. It's a must see play. Congratulations to all.


vera davis

said about: Cold Turkey at Nana’s

My first time at pie play pint. saw cold turkey at nana's. Couldn't have chosen a better play to start with. Humourous also sad at times. Brought my niece who was on holiday from New York with her daughter & the 3 generations enjoyed the same humour and wonderful acting. Thank you


donna middlemass

said about: Critics Circle Winner

well after the fabulous xmas panto,could that be topped, yes indeed,what a delight of song,wit and humour, superbly delivered by a fantastic 4some,l just love each and every show, they are so varied and though provoking,its definately get the old brain box switched on ticking till the following weeks delights,,makes me feel alive to the delights of live entertainment,cheers to one and all, noone could do it better.


Michael

said about: The Jean-Jacques Rousseau Show

as an Englishman abroad I have to commend all concerned,reminds me of the political satires of the 1960s good enough for televising.


Rosemary

said about: The Jean-Jacques Rousseau Show

Thoroughly enjoyed the Jean-Jacques Rousseau Show! I'd recommend it to everyone who likes a lively show that makes you laugh. Congratulations to all involved.


Sarah Evans Guthrie

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Excited to see the resurgence of a lunchtime theatre - I was involved in Theatrescope Original Lunch Hour Plays back in 1966. It was the first lunchtime theatre to happen, ran for about 2 years in a small space off St Martin's Lane, and for 5s (25p) you could get a sandwich, banana and hot drink (we also took luncheon vouchers). Two performances a day, a new production every week, playing to an audience of 50 comprising mainly office workers and passers-by. Perhaps there's someone out there who remembers it? Best of luck with this venture, sounds wonderful. Sarah Guthrie


Jane Grove

said about: Critics' Circle Competition Winner

Not the most popular...that was kind. I thought this one was at times, dare I say, dire, although the initial premise was interesting and there were some moments of sparkle. Luckily, PPP is always refreshing, challenging and interesting even when it may not be what you were expecting. That is the joy of experiencing new writing. Make sure you don't miss Born to Run this week. It's simply brilliant.


David Maclennan

said about: Sex, Chips and the Holy Ghost TRAILER

Happy New Year to all you Play/Pie/Pinters. I'm very much looking forward to seeing you back at Oran Mor when the new season kicks off - we've got some cracking shows for you between now and the beginning of June. Paddy Cunneen is taking 'Fleeto!' and 'Wee Andy' to the Adelaide Festival in February, Mull Theatre are touring Martin McCardie's 'From Paisley to Paolo' and Andy Duffy's 'Waterproof' on a six week Highland and Island tour starting in March and Gerda Stevenson is going to New York with Dave Anderson in April to 59 East 59th Theatre to do her play 'Federer versus Murray.' So where Glasgow leads the rest of the World follows. Very best wishes, David MacLennan


maureen henderson

said about: A Play A Pie and A Panto: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

you did not need the other six ..the seventh was funny enough.............very good


Patrick McErlane

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

Hi, Attended the 3 o'clock performance of panto yesterday. Thouroughly enjoyed it, very funny. Would it be possible for you to name the full cast? Thanks


Alice Doyle

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

Hilarious stuff!! Well done everyone, thanks for kicking off Christmas for us!!


Dianne Kerr

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

First time at this type of event and loved it. Brought my husband as we rarely get to act like big kids and that's what the show is all about. Reliving childhood pantos but with a XXX status... The characters were very good and we laughed almost constantly throughout at the tongue in cheek humour. I commented to my husband on the way out that it's not surprising that there were almost 400 of an audience. You could see that the cast were having such a good time, it was so evident on the stage you couldnt help feeling it too. Well done everyone and Merry Christmas.... X


Wee Johnnie's Brither

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

See Woe Shite, whit a fucking laff! Filled ma nappies it wiz that guid. . . . and the beer wiz guid tae,so it wiz. . . Here's strength tae yir elbow. Nae hauf, Johnnie's brither (aged 3)


admin

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

Hi Julie. The Panto last for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes. We have a performance at 1pm Monday - Saturday, with extra performances at 3pm on Wed 14th, Fri 16th, Sat 17th, Wed 21st, Thurs 22nd, Fri 23rd and Sat 24th. PPP Team.


julie

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

how long is the panto/what time does it end, please (have to consider public transport home!)


Ellie Stewart

said about: New Voices

Great project. Will you be doing this again next year?


admin

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

Hi Glen. The Panto is written with our usual adult audience in mind and contains some language which some parents might not think suitable for their children. Hope this has been helpful. PPP Team


Glen Houten

said about: Christmas Pantomime: Snow White and the Seventh Dwarf

Hi - Just wondered if this is an adult play?


mo cullen

said about: Bite the Bullet - Video Interview

Bite the bullet - A laugh, a tear, a song amazing.


George Cameron

said about: Jen Hainey

Did you see Britannia Rules at the Gaiety in Ayr that's where I saw it!!


George Cameron

said about: The Kiss

When The Kiss by Murray Watts opened I thought it was going to be a play about memory loss, but as the two characters Man and Woman interact it becomes a play about snatches of memory remembered. Who are the Characters, husband and wife, young lovers, Mother and Son? I think the answer to that is yes. Through the two actors we get snapshots of what has been played out and thought while sitting on that park bench. Both actors always framing the brass memorial “In Loving Memory” which was the central point to the play.


Gordon Ross

said about: David Hayman reprises his role in 'Six and a Tanner' at Oran Mor

Is there a list of where David Haymans play six and a tanner is playing. Thanks.


Harry Kielty

said about: The Murder of Geoffrey Robbins

Geoff??????dead????? noooooooooooooooooooooo...... sorry sons


jim kennedy

said about: Critics' Circle Winner

A beautifully crafted little play of an ideal size for a Play, a Pie and a Pint. The arid relationship between the two characters was underscored with some clever dialogue, the choreography was brilliantly conceived and equally brilliantly executed by the actors-it was balletic at times. The set was wonderful as was the lighting and effects. Yet by the end I was profoundly unmoved, feeling no empathy with either character. I didn't really care whether they were in Dublin, Galway or Helmand. Still-maybe next week!


Jackie Patterson

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Patsy Cline and a bottle of Wine was absolutely brilliant. I don’t usually bother to write in but we haven’t seen a show this good in years! Will it be coming back? All four of us were knocked out, I’d be back tomorrow if I had a ticket, it was worth every penny. More shows like this please! Jackie P.


Anna Redmayne

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Wow! I saw your production of Patsy Cline last night and it was absolutely stunning. I haven’t enjoyed a show so much in years. There were 3 generations of us at the show and we were all knocked out. Who needs the West End of London when our own West end is bringing us top class entertainment like this? I recommend this show, to everyone, it’s outstanding. Thankyou.


admin

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

All the programme information is listed in the 'Plays' section of the website. Hope this helps. PPP team


K SLATER

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

took my grandaughter ( 16)to aplay a pie and a pint in july and she loved it and keeps asking when we can go back is there anything on in the afternoon again please let me know as i cant find anything on the web site


eleanor wark

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

I have seen many shows at the Oran Mor but tonights performance of Patsy Cline and a Bottle of Wine took my breath away.. it’s a long time since I’ve been in a theatre and felt such a collective sense of pure enjoyment. As an audience we were brilliantly entertained by a small but hugely talented cast, the story telling was superb and the ensemble playing terrific . Gail Watson is a tour de force, holding the audience spellbound with a mesmerising central performance. I am not a big country music fan and had to be dragged along, but I can honestly say it doesn’t matter whether you’re a Patsy Cline fan or not, this show reaches parts other theatre gets nowhere near – the audience were stamping for an encore and got one, we ended up dancing in the aisles… when did that last happen in a theatre? Thankyou Oran Mor for a great night out.


lesley paterson

said about: You Cannot Go Forward From Where You Are Right Now

Well acted. It was one of those plays one did not quite get into at the time, but when thought about later the stories told all came together.The father and daughter scenes were all too familiar. Phone technology has skipped ganerations! The radio presenters and public phone-ins were so real but not willing to hear peoples real problems. The man with dodgy sat nav to the pub was so let down by police and ambulance communications when he had his accident. The dog survived! Love to see it again. Man with dog directed by sat nav? to pub. We hear radio communication with police accident and ambulance to save drink related accident victim.Dog has survived.


Geoffrey Robbins

said about: The Murder of Geoffrey Robbins

I have grave reservations.


Christine and Stephen Curran

said about: Supply

Supply 'covered' a master class in comic delivery. It was all there, quick fire timing, pathos and innuendo , culminating in hilarious use of interactive classroom technology. The parts played by Chelsea, Shannon and Mr Small were inspired casting. Truly this was Cfe - comedy for excellence!


Dominic

said about: Angels

Saw this last week, loved it. Well done to Iain Robertson for putting on such a great performance.


Robin Ewart

said about: Cathy Forde

This is a beautifully observed piece of writing about how a young man on his first day as a supply teacher is bullied by a couple of teenaged girls. The situation has probably been experienced by many young teachers but Cathy Forde probably draws more humour from the young man's predicament than would actually happen in real life. Brilliantly acted by a young cast, including a real sixth former; we hope they all go far. An enjoyable and funny lunch time experience.


Yvonne McHardy

said about: Another Four Stars for Angels ****

I was very impressed with Ian Robertson's perfomance in Angels. His portrayal of the lonley, confused and downright terrified security guard Nick Prentice was amazing. i was drawn into the interview room and went through every emotion with him as he tried to come to terms with was happening. I hung on his every word, felt every drip of his sweat,his panic gripped me and i stayed with him in that small grubby room until the light finally went out.


Louise Smith

said about: [ neh - see -ens ] written by Gabriel Robertson

I also saw this play on Friday. I really enjoyed the show however I felt that it could have done with another weeks rehearsal. The performances were fine, however one of the cast looked a bit lost at times. Sitting at the back I wasn't able to hear a lot of the dialogue, and at times I could only hear Scott Cadenhead who seemed to be the only one able to use his voice and project. and for me he stole the show with wonderful comedic moments. I hope this show gets another chance and that we get to see this play again. Can't wait to see the season of plays at Play, Pie and a Pint, I wish they'd put some of those plays on at night.


Stephen Graham

said about: [ neh - see -ens ] written by Gabriel Robertson

Really enjoyed it. Highly recommend if it comes back.


Lyndsay McKenzie

said about: [ neh - see -ens ] written by Gabriel Robertson

Agreed. Didn't know much about the play, but had seen one of the actors before. Still though, what a fantastic play. My only criticism; it was too short!


Gary Chesire

said about: [ neh - see -ens ] written by Gabriel Robertson

I popped along on impulse to see this, without knowing much about it. I frequently visit Oran Mor for their play, pie and pint plays, so I thought at worst, it's be ok. To say I was pleasantly surprised is an understatement. The play was totally different from what I was expecting, with a strange take on the usual 3 act structure. Light shows, sound only portions and only a second act that consisted of actors was as fresh as it was intelligent. Not knowing any of the names involved turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Paul Cassidy as John was great, Scott Campbell as Mark was mesmorizing and the script was multilayered with tension, drama and at times outright hilarity. The direction of the play was sleek and composed; why have I not heard of this guy? I will eagerly look out for anything involving the guys from now on and highly recommend you do the same! 5 stars! Gary


Catherine Czerkawska

said about: Jen Hainey

One of the best and most sympathetic directors I've ever had the privilege of working with! And she's right - the Oran Mor is a shining exception to the general rule that women do tend to struggle in Scottish theatre.


Wim de Vos

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

I was over from Holland for three days and saw the show with 3 friends of mine. We all had a great time especially the end song was great!!!!


Jason Park

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

My aunt brought me to a play a pie and a pint or in my case a diet coke. I loved the set desgin and the amazing actors and it was only when i got home that i found out my Dad used to have a pint with Dave Anderson. The story of the play related to the young and old the atmoshpere was amazing. I had a giggle off stage beacuse there was a group of older women in front of us 5 of them had champagne with rasberrys in them but the oldest woman had a pint why not. But the side jokes were perfect and the accsents were bang on. But the best part for mee was the way the actors used old Glasgow toung. but dave anderson was great at acting drunk brill act 10 out of 10 or 5 starts loved it


Mal Cornass

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

This theatrical experience crosses somewhere between a traditional end of the pier show in the style of "Oh what a lovely war" with its primary colours and ensemble players and a good old fashioned Scottish Pantomime from the 50s or 60s. The content is far from old fashioned. It plays with your expectations and experience of pantomime. Written with great style, not a moment wasted and played with all the gusto and irreverence that makes a Scottish pantomime so different from an English one. Scottish pantomime stars from Harry Gordon to Gerard Kelly would have loved to have been in this show.


maureen henderson

said about: Dave Anderson and David MacLennan

loved the show today you worked your sock off................... paisley girl


Hugh Boyd

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

David MacLennan and Dave Anderson’s great script of Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair inspired a multi-role-ing cast in a rollicking panto. Super stage designs let Heather Malcolm and Emma Sweeney turn the paddle steamer Waverley into a forest. Dave Anderson, on-board inebriated puppeteer, switched Granny’s, Juliet Cadzow, granddaughter into Cora Bissett’s feisty Goldilocks who met various human creepy crawlies in the woods. Gavin Wright was multi-brilliant. There was a whiff of nostalgia but not too Molly Weir! Our side sang loudest – Oh Yes we did. Hats off to the technical wizards at the back controlling the music and lights.


Lynn Drennan

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

We were still laughing half way up Great Western Road! A rip-roaring, audience participating hoot of a show that had holding our sides and wiping away the tears... The whole cast was great but the Uncle Archie and Teddy Bears characters were pure dead brilliant!!


Gerard Connolly

said about: Summer Panto: Goldilocks and the Glasgow Fair

The whole thing was absolute nonsense, in the age old tradition of a pantomime, winter or summer. The talented boys and girls on stage certainly enjoyed it and the audience cheered them on... Oh no they didn't! Oh yes..... enough of that. The repeated use of the word "shite" lost its impact after the first time and Maggie Thatcher being rising from the undead was unimaginative. The enjoyment of the audience said it all, and the pie was good.


Joe Haggart

said about: Classic Cuts Season: A Midsummer Night's Dream Adapted by Andy Gray

Having performed as Bottom at school in 1960 I could only look on in admiration as I was shown how the part should have been played. The excellent cast truely did cast a spell over the audience as well as Titania with their wit and proffesionalism. The players showed that Shakespeare had a wicked sense of humour that brout the characters to life.


Clive Bell

said about: Classic Cuts Season: Wind in the Pines (Matsukaze) Adapted by Paddy Cunneen

Hi, I'm Clive Bell and I'm playing music in the Matsukaze Noh play. I just wanted to clear up a small point: a Noh play doesn't normally last five hours. One play takes around an hour, and a Japanese audience would go to an afternoon of plays - say, three Noh plays and two short "Kyogen" comedies - stretching over 5 or 6 hours. During that time you can come and go, leave the auditorium for a drink or tea and cake, return refreshed to see your favourite actor, and so on. It's a relaxed but highly literary way of spending a day. So our version of Matsukaze is not really condensed, but a similar length to the real thing. Meanwhile, thanks for all the great audience feedback,and it's been a great pleasure playing at Oran Mor. Best wishes, Clive.


Richard Morrow

said about: Sins of the Fathers

This was my first visit to the Play/Pie/Pint and what a stormer. Hayman and Scanlan were fantastic. I'll be back for plenty more of this stuff. If you haven't been, go.


Amy Gilmartin

said about: Top Table

Dear Craig and Michelle, Thank you so much for inviting me to your special day. I enjoyed the wedding pie. And everything and everyone looked beautiful. Don’t worry that it wasn’t perfect Michelle. Every bride wants a fairy tale wedding, but we all can’t be Kate. Weddings tend to bring out the worst in families. Like many weddings I have been to, I found the speeches a little long – but that tends to happen at weddings! I think your dad was a little high spirited (with the special day, and, well, the drink). All the best for your future.


Hugh Kelly

said about: Top Table

It was with a little more trepadation than usual that I made my way up Byres Road this week, as I was introducing two English friends to Oran Mor's famous Play, Pie and a Pint. Would they understand the West of Scotland humour once they mastered the accent? The second and third elements went down a treat, as they scoffed down the pie and quaffed the white wine with unusual Southern gusto. When the lights dimmed and the main event (for me) got underway the Top Table filled the stage in such a way that it became the stage itself. When the father of the bride and the best man took their places and faced the "guests" without bride, groom or bridesmaid it was evident that there had been a stramash off stage. Encouraged by frequent visits to his beerr glass, the father meandered through a family history, often going off message to fire barbed darts at various members of this dysfunctional family. It was becoming obvious that the hours old wedding was in trouble and great efforts were being made off stage to patch things up by the bridesmaid, Shilpa. At last when the father had exhausted his venom and most of the booze on the table, the best man, his son rose to his feet to give his take on the proceedings. Both speeches were long and wordy but delivered by two excellent actors with great passion and comic timing. Even the the F word, not usual at wedding speeches, was used to great effect and never did I feel like they were dragging out the script. When, mid speech, the bride arrived, she brought with her an air of pathos along with the best line in the play regarding her Hindu bridesmaid at their hen do. By this time the audience were almost twitching in their seats hoping for news of a happy ending to the big day but the groom didn't appear and the bride gave us no hope of a reconcilliation. Rob Drummond sent us away smiling but also reflecting on, what seemed to be the underlying moral message, that, try as we might, perfection is beyond us and even the Royal Family fall short when it comes to marriage. The play ticked all the boxes for me and I would recomment it to anyone, even F---ing Jackie Bird.


Grace Mackinnon

said about: Thank God for John Muir

A bare stage with a single chair and a woman in black playing the small pipes – were we in for an hour’s dreich? John Muir’s quietly hypnotic and poetic monologue of his young life and his growing love of the natural world seeped into the bones and the mind; little for us to see but much to imagine. Garry Collins’s performance was at once restrained and passionate (only in the last few seconds did we actually see his eyes unbound and open) while Annie Grace’s sympathetic musical accompaniment helped create exactly the right unobtrusive backdrop. A small gem of a play, an unexpected delight.


annie knight

said about: Thank God for John Muir

Well done Garry , I heard you were amazing, not surprised, your Aeriel view is great what a Photo. Have a wonderful week and a last night party. Hugs Annie.x.x


Robin Paine

said about: Thank God for John Muir

A tour de force! A blinded John Muir in Wisconsin at 28 remembers the natural beauty of his Scottish and American worlds with a poetic and anguished monologue. As his sight returns unexpectedly he pledges to protect the natural world. Award-winning Playwright, Andrew Dallmeyer accurately draws on his knowledge and love of the ecology of Muir's birthplace, Dunbar, East Lothian while Collin's Muir journey's towards the light.


Jen Thomson

said about: From Paisley to Paolo

I just wanted to say that my friend and I thoroughly enjoyed this play! The three characters were played brilliantly and my face hurt from laughing so much! Thanks for a great time!


Ian McSeveny

said about: Miracle

The young Einstein is entranced by the beauty of conceptual physics and of physical love. But one will dominate to the detriment of the other. The dialogue, making impressive use of Einstein’s own words, clearly captures the relentless intellect expanding beyond Newton into a theory of space-time culminating in the miracle year 1905, while neglecting the mundane practicalities and inevitable consequences of living with his betrothed. McCartney has created her own curved world space-time-life continuum on that small stage where the two actors successfully convey the limitation of a relationship constrained by the (gravitational) distortion of time-life by genius.


Mary Boyle

said about: From Paisley to Paolo - Four Stars ****

Martin McCardie's black comedy from Paisley to Paulo deals with a variety of themes,in a witty and sometimes hilarious manner.Urban decay and its accompanying hopelessness, friendship and gender stereotyping are explored by Jack, Mavis and Charlie the play's three characters skillfully portrayed by James Young,James Kirk and Alan Tripney. Whilst hugely enjoying the performance, I feel the piece would be served far more effectively via the medium of a short film as it has a distintive "road" feel waiting to be explored and developed to a greater degree. It also possesses a wealth of latent visual classic comedic possibilities, such as the hearse and the mobile handset offering hope like an updated Pandora's box.


nan.wallace

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

I was the one who handed David MacLennan a table mat on which I'd jotted down some ideas re a title for the summer panto (when I was at the venue for the Xmas panto). Couldn't believe it when I saw that my brainchild - "Goldilocks and the Glasgow fair" had actually been used! Feel free to give him my e-mail address so he can congratulate me on my inspired thinking!!! Can't wait to see it!! Nan


Jane Grove

said about: The End of Hope, The End of Desire

"Famous" poet abandons Dispatches and throws caution to the wind in secret liaison with oversized mouse. Big brother addict has one-night stand with man whose hair is not as nice as Tony Blair's. A hilarious clashing of cultural references in this week's outstanding offering at Oran Mor has the audience weeping with laughter. If you only see one Play, a Pie and a Pint this season make it this one. You'll be hooked.


George Cameron

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

Superb play, just to let you know when you click buy now for Goose it comes to product not found. link here http://www.audible.co.uk/aduk/site/product.jsp?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&p=BK_KLUG_000001UKs Worth letting Helen know as sales this week could be high, after the magnificent Dacha All the best G


Fergus Morgan

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

Wonderful, wonderful, if you have a free lunchtime go along to this deeply moving play. It keeps you gripped.


Karen Mount

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

I DID catch the Dacha and thank the heavens I did, what a theatrical treat. Such believable and substantial performances. The piece is written in such a way that it draws you in, the two women and their SECRETS....heartbreaking but most of all a lesson and example of well structuted and imaginative writing. Very atmospheric. Well done indeed and thank you for great entertainment.


Kulaska Mulkovich

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

I happened upon this play yesterday lunchtime and it transported me back to my youth, as a ballerina. This was a twohander completely rivetting. The performers inhabited their roles totally and if you want to see examples of what acting is really about go and see this. The ballerina, had SUCH stage presence, I took my son who is 14 and he was engrossed. The ballerina's maid was superb and I really dont think there is a better way to spend a chilly Scottish lunchtime than watching this highly well written piece.


christine Kavanagh

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

Sounds fascinating wish I was local to the theatre to see the production. Good Luck


karen mount

said about: Helen Kluger Video Interview

What an eloquent and intelligent and funny writer, I shall certainly be downloading her play on line and am anxious to catch the Dacha.


J.Gordon-Smith

said about: St Catherine’s Day

If last week's lunchtime comedy were a type of food, it might be a great big Chocolate Brazil. Sweet, tasty and good for you - in 'St Catherine's Day' written by the UK's answer to Randy Newman - Michael Marra gives us a short lesson in sincerity revealed through panto timing and 'melt-in-the mouth' Irish humour. Featuring the gentle and comic talents of Ewan Donald and Richard Conlon, under Marra's affectionate confection lies an important message about the cult of personality and the demise of faith. With crisp direction by Jemima Lewick and ingenious comic devise by Patrick McGurn, 'St Catherine's Day' plays Dundee Repertory Theatre 'til April 9th. It could do with longer - oh and maybe a prequel - but suck it and see.


Tom Pow

said about: Mike Gonzalez

Terrific conversation. Unfortunately, I was not able to attend the performances, but I sense the excitement and the scope of the series from this engaging interview.


Joe Haggart

said about: **** Four Stars for Saint Catherine's Day

ST CATHERINE'S DAY...what a wonderful play featuring a myriad of comic characters,some more intentional than others, with a cast of three.Special mention must go to Ewan Donald for portaying such a diverse array of talent.I'm sure many heads were nodding in agreement at the conversation between the two singers in the hotel bar.The final realisation that the old way was the best would I am sure be echoed by the majority of the audience.


Frances Tennant

said about: St Catherine’s Day

Really enjoyed the play today.wonderful characterisations.Very impressed that Ewan Donald coped so well in changing his role so often.The singing was lovely,beautiful ballad towards the end of the play.It was a most enjoyable hour!


Julia Gordon-Smith

said about: One Night in Iran

In 'One Night in Iran' the dialogue revolves around an Emperor sized bed - a perfect metaphor for the emotional and legal barriers separating our two adulterous lovers. We never hear their names, but can testify to their intimacy and strangeness, passions and doubts. Nabil Stuart's passivity & soft tones help convey a certain ineptness at duplicity which may sentence both characters to death; whilst Amiera Darwish exquisitly conveys the rage and defiance at a faith which entraps her with it's hypocrisy. The lovers' faith triumphs the hour, but we leave the theatre sadly uncertain for their future. (97 words)


Charlie Stuart

said about: The Soap Hour: The Light of Her Eyes

Brilliant. Absorbing and amazing. The story of real life tragedy presented on top of the melodrama of a radio soap opera. Cleverly staged and seamlessly interweaving music that would have been worth the ticket money alone. What a multi-talented cast ! Shame it's not touring. The house was full but there's a bigger audience for theatre this good.


Margaret Bickerton

said about: The Soap Hour: The Light of Her Eyes

One of the best plays I have seen at Oran Mor. All the actors were superb.


Carol H

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

I went to the Oran Mor PPP season at the Belgrade Theatre in Coventry late summer - and really enjoyed not just the plays but the whole experience and this way of seeing theatre. Please can you come again? I hope so. Carol


Stephen Mitchell

said about: Four Parts Broken by Fernanda Jaber

In a succession of two-handers we meet four vulnerable and damaged people. Two boys on the cusp of adulthood and an estranged couple. Despite the action beginning with the discovery of a rather grisly body-part in a bag, the play is more concerned with peeling away the layers of denial and bravado that the characters hide behind. Each successive pairing explores a different facet of each character, neatly dovetailing their back-story with the present action. I was left with a greater understanding and sympathy for characters desperate to love and to be loved.


alastair mcfarlane

said about: Bunnies

What we seek from the script of our lunch time escapism is entertainment, thought provoking at times, humorous at others, perhaps with a little nudge to make us think further about the plot. Bunnies satisfied all those criteria...and, indeed, a whole lot more since here we found three actors giving of their all in fantastic performances. Each got right under their character and, from this, gave us the type of theatre we can now depend on a Play, a Pie and a Pint providing. This was indeed superb entertainment a great script and exceptional acting


Tom Brodie

said about: Programme Announced

Please keep "I'm a dug" out. Tom Brodie


thom cross

said about: Programme Announced

Should there be a slip and you need one more play may I propse my adaption 'I'm a dug' from 'the Manwho turned into a dog' by Osvaldo Dragun tm cross


admin

said about: The Sunday Lesson Review

Hi. This is actually an email address, and not a website. To enter email the answer to great.giveaways@heraldandtimes.co.uk along with your name, address and daytime telephone number, putting PPP in the subject line. Good luck! PPP


Mrs E. Kavanagh

said about: The Sunday Lesson Review

Trying to enter competition for season passes worth £280 for Play Pie and A Pint as advertised in Fridays Evening Times 14th Jan. Can you tell me exactly where this site is to enter as I can't find it on great.giveaways@heraldandtimes.couk


Robert Wilson

said about: Casablanca (The Lunchtime Cut)

Being so close to the actors really delivered the emotional punch that this story is renowned for....love sacrificed for a greater cause...still fill up at the memory of it!


Robert Wilson

said about: Sleeping Beauty

Like bein' a wean again...pure stoatin' man


Dave H

said about: Sleeping Beauty

Went to Oran Mor last Saturday and saw this play. It was hysterical and I really recommend it if you want to see a pantomime for adults. 5 star entertainment from some local celebs.


Sarah McIlraith

said about: Sleeping Beauty

Heard it was brilliant Very sorry that our Studio Arts Forum in Cumbernauld could not attend due to bus cancellation due to bad weather conditions.


Beverley Brown

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

...and ignore the crappy sentence structure and spelling mistakes. I was sipping sambuka and crabbys ginger wine...while I pondered what to write.


Beverley Brown

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Wish I'd sat in Ann Marie Di Mambro's seat so I couldv'e kissed Sandy Nelson. But then, so did we Mairead Martin...and I'm not sure but Phillip Larkin may have been in there too! Nah...just kidding. I do know our darling course tutor (Ann Marie) kicked her heels up like Dorothy all the way home. Brilliant multi-panto, excellent use of space, imagination, narrative and audience participation. Well done to you all for making me stop assessing the structure as I sat, and dragging me (albeit kicking and screaming) in to audience participate. I don't think I've sang in public since I was in the school choir. :D


Ali Catterall

said about: The House

Lovers of black comedies, particularly the work of Martin McDonagh (In Bruges), will be in their element here, with this savagely funny short from actor/writer Steve McNicoll and director Sacha Kyle The set-up's simple enough: workmen Jerry and Joe (Lewis Howden and James Young) shoot the breeze downstairs on matters of the heart, while their Yeats-spouting colleague 'Mad' Jim Black (Kieran Cunningham, in a role specially written for him) makes one hell of a racket upstairs. The exact nature of the 'building' work being carried out, or of Jerry and Joe's conversation and its outcome, is left for the audience to ponder (uncomfortably, after lights out). Shocking, surprising - and surprisingly moving, The House features sterling work from the three leads and lines that will nest in your head for days afterwards. (Just don't ask the precise meaning of the phrase "Idi Amin with his arms folded".)


Mary Cameron

said about: Songs of Joyce

We introduced two friends to their first visit to a play a pie and a pint. What an introduction for them, this was first class entertainment of a very high standard, thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish. The girls were vocally and visually brilliant. Bring them back again. Well done "A Play a Pie and a Pint"


mark harrison

said about: The Woman from the North

can i buy a audio cd fo the play the woman form the north Iam a dementia trainer and it would make a powerfull toot to change the old culture it would be a great dvd also are there any copies any were that i can buy best wishes Mark


John Turner-Layden

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Thank you for my first experience of your (PPP),brings me back to my young life. Alhough lets me know my past life,there is much more to my life than this. I am almost (70 Years) old and have a much more life. Although brought up un the gorbals,i had a great time for large families which i was the oldes of nine.Ever been to a residential school ,not an approved school. If you would like some old stories ,let me know. Yours, J.L.


Jock Barge

said about: One Gun

Is public art simply a worthless bourgeois imposition? It’s rare to find a writer tackle such a question directly, but Ian Low’s ‘One Gun’ grabs it by the throat. Set in a small Scottish town following a boy’s death, the story follows his mother, a UN arms decomissioner and a public artist as they meet to plan the official response. Clashes ensue as we explore the three troubled backstories and watch each struggle with their own loneliness and futility. The result is a vivid and credible show that is by turns coarse, cynical and quietly peculiar, yet ultimately curiously affecting.


Martin Farrer

said about: 200th Play

Drained glass – ate pie: What followed in 20 odd plays:- Laughed, cried, thought, sang, agreed, identified, disagreed, marvelled, nearly wet myself( Thanks to Andy Gray) Felt as though we had been at a wonderful birthday party – tried singing ” Bring on the Pies” on the train home – well done Oran Mor


Jean Reid

said about: Critics' Circle Competition Winner

Thanks for reply online - checked my junk mail and found your original message: can't think why it should have landed there. Anyway I now have confirmation and will present it at bar today if I make the show. Cheers! Jean


Beth Cullen

said about: 200th Play

200th Play - absolutely fantastic! We also saw Linda McLean's play a couple of weeks back. Loved the subject and thought it perfectly cast. We never miss a Panto a Pie and a Pint. Is there any chance of it ever continuing between Xmas and New Year?


admin

said about: Critics' Circle Competition Winner

Hi Jean. I emailed through a confirmation email to the address that was supplied by yourself when you submitted your review. It may be the case that the email didn't make it through. I will email again, but please do get in touch if you do not receive this (Oran Mor 0141 357 6200). Sarah


Sue Hunter Smith

said about: Good With People

Excellent on every level. (can I have my whisky now?)


A.Lindsay

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

I saw Calais at the weekend and cannot help feeling somewhat frustrated. I felt the script was weak which resulted in the actors having a difficult task.The sun was shining outside and it was a holiday weekend which may have been responsible for the emptry seats. I love PPP and have seen many memorable shows uhnfortunately this wasn't one of them.


Karen Galbraith

said about: The Sunday Lesson

I haven't laughed so much in a long time. This was my first visit to Oran Mor and I hope many more to come. GREAT.


Jean Reid

said about: Calais

Nelson is dead, and his mistress and daughter have fled to the Channel port where they survive by pawning the last of their finery to keep the landlord at bay and food on the table. But Emma in rich in attitudes – the dramatic poses of classical characters with which she charmed the Hamilton circle – and hopes to impress a French soiree. April de Angelis has created a starring part for Joanna Bacon who, buoyed up by red wine and memories, is ludicrous and pitiable by turns. The anachronistic exchanges with the naive Louise Ford are entertaining but also touching.


David & Yvonne

said about: Calais

Incroyable says nous! Magnifique, cette jolie bon play partly performed en Franglais. Plot follows les jours derniere de poverty struck exiled Emma, Lady Hamilton, , ironically in France, avec daughter Horatia. Her shockingly liberated life, even today, eventually to become Lord Nelson’s mistress. (Could a modern day Nelson survive the scandal of such a risqué woman as Emma) Amazing history at Oran Mor. Wonderful demonstration of Lady Hamilton’s true ‘shawl’ act. Pity Horatia didn’t kiss excellently played Frenchman and turn into the fille-en-law of le maire…if not a Princess. Alors, quell dommage, mais c’est la vie. Encore April De Angelis


T Deveney

said about: Calais

Of a lunchtime I went to a play, That was simply entitled, ‘Calais’. Twas about an old lady Who was not in her heyday And yet she could still shout Allez! Her husband had died out at sea, A lonely, single mother was she. She had gone to the dogs when he popped his clogs Stuck in France without a bonne nuit. Penniless, she still managed to drink, But really had reached the brink. She took to her bed, Then woke up dead And her daughter was back in the pink.


Krista Kleinberg

said about: The Uncertainty Files

One thing is certain in this week’s play: the three actors who play the part of 13 interviewees posed with the question,”What can you be certain of in this life?”, deliver word perfect performances (‘ums and ‘ahs’ included). The audience become a fly on the wall of what feels like a giant therapy session and what unravels from the apparent minutaie of our everyday insecurities about who we think we are and who and what shapes and defines us, is a long thread that in some way connects us in the context of a wider world where we often feel alone.


A Strachan

said about: In the Pipeline

Mixed performances but good way to spend a lunch time. It was an interesting idea – 3 stories, told in monologue form, linked by the theme of the closing of a power station. The first story was engagingly performed, with humour and conviction. So too was the last story.Meg Wynn Owen has a lovely voice and drew one into her story.(I recognised her as the a well known cast member of Upstairs Downstairs) The second story was less well thought out, a little forced and the actor nervous and forgetful.Worth a look.


J M Gordon

said about: Fly Me To The Moon

If life is a tragedy to those who feel, and a comedy to those who think, then death provides a bit of both in this hilarious play by Marie Jones. The ubiquity of the dead Davie means that we never lose sight of the serious issues it raises as we follow the exploits of Frances and Loretta.The success of the play lies in the fact that as we blink away tears of laughter in the brightness of the day, we are left contemplating important questions about old age, disability and loneliness and wondering what kind of society pays the mimimum wage to those who serve the community so well.


Jim Crawley

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Excellent play today, been coming to the shows since they started. Great writing and comic timing. PS David do we get the £500 back? Keep up the good work. Jim


admin

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

First play of the Season today. Don't forget to leave a review for our Critics' Circle Competition.


Stephen Henson

said about: Lysistrata by Aristophanes

Oh the banter over a pie and a pint The Greeks have no idea how we can slight The glesca gods of booze, patter and agro All present here in a brammer of a show Colin and Ian grand dames indeed With Ian acting aff his heed Colin plots and plans and teeters With a chorus of chitonisko’ed tweeters Giving voice to songs by McLennan They croon and chirp through to the end an Stumbling over a line or two Do not corpse but see it through Lines may change or stuttered over Action flows and then they go for Ian’s big sex scene Dave’s the husband Erections to deal with in the club land Dave’s on to nowt though Ian leads him on No shag tonight with or without a Trojon Special visitors from Atlanta came to view Lost in translation I think we knew Peace breaks out there’s sex and panting Colin and Ian no more ganting Lights go out and curtain falls Crowd cheers on at the company’s balls What a way to spend an hour Pies all gone and plays all ower Lines though linger and will last Always able to raise a laugh Cleverly written composed and sung By a company cucumberly hung With nothing forthcoming from the treasury I’ve written this at my leisury (understand now?)


alastair mcfarlane

said about: Lysistrata by Aristophanes

All of the cast worked together magnificently well in a superb ending to a brilliant season. No one could do anything other than guffaw at the outrageousness of the whole show not least the asides from the principles. It certainly deserves its X certificate ...as well, of course, as greater exposure! The gallus humour came shining through in almost every line. We shared with the actors the fact that they were really enjoying themselves..and we have two new magical ugly sisters. What a show...what a finale...we needed something to lift our depressed spirits and the cucumbers certainly helped!


Isobel

said about: Week Three of Corona Classic Cuts (Video Interview)

Brilliant production of this stunning play. A skilled adaptation by the director and a moving portrayal by a hard working cast. The sense of oppression throughout is so tangible that, at times, one almost feels pinned to ones' seat. Strung through with touches of humour there is also a feeling of hope in the face of adversity. Go along if you can...it would be a shame to miss it!


admin

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Hi Paul - All the upcoming plays can be found in the 'Plays' section. You will find the taskbar running along the top of the homepage. Hope this helps!


Paul Rooney

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Please do something with your site. Trying to find out what plays are on for the Play, Pie Pint thing is very difficult.


Hugh Boyd

said about: The Sunday Lesson Review

Unlike the world, the Oran Mor’s Play, Pie and Pint season ended with bangs but no whimpers. The Sunday Lesson was the weekly driving lesson and the cockpit for the changing relations between brash father and laid back son. If that sounds serious it was the opposite. Playwright Cathy Forde’s ear for dialogue and local patter combined with great performances by Jimmy Chisholm and James Young kept the audience laughing. With grey hairs galore in the audience we saw ourselves living through the times when we too adapted as our chicks fled the nest. A great end to the series.


sandra burnett

said about: Game, Set and Match!

What a wonderful play! So much emotion in such a short time.Maureen Beattie is superb and Gerry Mulgrew is a class act. Do not miss this highly topical and emotional play. Well done Gerda.


Irene Robertson

said about: Please Mister (with video interview)

I took my friend to see Please mister. It was her first at a "Play Pie and Pint". We were both totally bowled over by the acting . Superbly done! Thank you for a great experience.


tracey mccarry

said about: Please Mister (with video interview)

brilliant play very sad and worth seeing well done pat need to bring it to rothesay x


Mary Boyle

said about: The Woman from the North Review

The Woman from the North by Bernard MacLaverty captures the dilemma of dementia from the viewpoint of the sufferer,in this case Cassie Quinn,who has been placed in residential care by her concerned son for assessment. A diagnosis of his mother's worrying behaviour. It is a moving piece which captures the bewilderment Cassie experiences in trying to come to terms with her new circumstances. It's simple staging and strong performance from Eileen Nicholas as Cassie, almost make one feel an intruder, witnessing the diminishing identity of Cassie before our very eyes, feeling compassion for her plight yet powerless to offer solutions or answers that will satisfy either party. To those of us who have experienced dementia first hand it is an accurate account of its beginnings, to others an insight into this thief of a disease which steals the very essence of our being.


Jeanette Molloy

said about: Casablanca (The Lunchtime Cut)

I seen this play yesterday and it is fabulous. The play of the year, most definately. Can you tell me if there are any future dates for this? My friend queued outside only to be disappointed along with many others as it was sold out. It was nice to meet Gavin in the lift before the show, who gave absolutely nothing away about the plot. LOL Please Please show this again???? Jeanette x


admin

said about: The Original Robinson Crusoe

Hi Marianna - Unfortunately is too late to win the bottle of Malt for Bear on a Chain, but thank you for your review! Glad you enjoyed the show and hope to see you again soon!


marianna lines

said about: The Original Robinson Crusoe

I have just reviewed this play for The St Andrews (Fife) Citizen, and send it on to you in case it is not too late. Sorry that it must be! I could not get it done in time for last week, as I only saw the show on Wednesday and was not home to write until now. I loved it and hope to see more! thank you Oran mor and Play and Pint people and especially sue glover!


marianna lines

said about: The Original Robinson Crusoe

BEAR ON A CHAIN by Sue Glover SWASHBUCKLING !… That great seadog of all seadogs, Alexander Selkirk, of famed historic lineage to Fife, is the star of the show in Sue Glover’s new play, ‘Bear on a Chain’, which opened to packed houses and rave reviews in Glasgow last week at the Oran Mor West End’s popular ‘A Play, a pie and a pint’ series. Sue Glover, a well known, seasoned playwright from Anstruther, has given us another exciting, memorable and historically based drama, based on the true character model for Robinson Crusoe, the most famous shipwrecked story of all time. Selkirk was from Largo, and went to sea as a boy, hardly ever returning until his epic rescue from the South Sea island of Juan Fernandez 400 miles off the coast of Chile in 1709. Described as being ‘like a herring in a net, his eyes like scales’, the return of Selkirk to Largo brings more trouble to the family and the community, and a predictable story for this buccaneer. He is described by his lapsed love interest sister in law Meg – a perfect character of an East Neuk fish wife – as like a goat running around his island … or as the vulnerable maiden Sophie says .. “like a bear on a chain, cryin’ and ragin’, a bear in a circus”. So the hooligan dancing bear finds his welcome not as good as expected as he returns home to Fife, the gentleman of leisure, then leaves again with yet another wake of broken hearts and pain. This short play tells the story in a vibrant electrifying way, staged as theatre in the round in the Oran Mor space, with a brilliant cast led by Gavin Keane as Sandy Selkirk, Pauline Knowles as Meg, and Rebecca Elise as Sophie Bruce. Keane as Selkirk is the perfect young and fit swashbuckling ego ridden seaman who soon finds that Largo is a jail, not a refuge. The story of Selkirk has been studied and written about for generations, but true facts have never been agreed, so it lends itself well to a dramatic interpretation as Sue Glover has certainly given us in top form! Returning to the light of a sunny Glasgow afternoon following the noon time drama, it felt as though one were truly in the grip of a wee fishing community in the net of another time and place. Marianna Lines


Catherine Czerkawska

said about: David Responds to Critics' Circle Ire

As one who has been the recipient of some mixed reviews in the past (sometimes, as I overheard when attending my own play at the Oran Mor, from members of the same family, arguing about it afterwards!) I say good for David, for taking risks. And he's absolutely right. There are many works that were celebrated as masterpieces at the time - perhaps because they were 'fashionable' - but that have sunk without trace - and others that have stood the test of time in spite of being slated by the critics. Anything that provokes a little debate can only be good for theatre in Scotland - sorry I couldn't manage to see this production!


Jennifer Hainey

said about: David Responds to Critics' Circle Ire

As far as I'm concerned, the reviews mean very little. If the producer, director, actors, everyone involved, believe in the production then it's a worthwhile piece of theatre. The great thing about this show (which I unfortunately will not get to see this week) is that it has provoked a debate and a divide with the audience. That means people are talking about it and that in itself is a great thing.


Donald Nelson

said about: David Responds to Critics' Circle Ire

I do not care for the views of critics. When I worked for Scottish Opera, and other companies, I would stand in the wings at the end of a show and watch a full house, on their feet clapping and cheering, only for the critics to rubbish it the next day. I am sure they all get together at the bar after sow and decide who is going to write what.


admin

said about: The Great Glasgow Pie Hunt & Quiz

Hi Michael. Yes we're not putting the pie in place until first thing Sunday morning, so if you happen to be found wandering down a muddy road this evening (causing a disturbance?) the pie-hunt alibi isn't going to stand up in court for you I'm afraid! Good luck finding it on Sunday!


MichaelM

said about: The Great Glasgow Pie Hunt & Quiz

You mean it isn't hidden yet? So if I went down to a certain muddy road tonight it wouldn't be round about there? :)


admin

said about: The Great Glasgow Pie Hunt & Quiz

Hi Ian. Yes we're giving the answer to each cryptic clue the next day, wouldn't want to exclude anyone who gets stuck from joining in the treasure hunt fun on Sun! How are you getting on? Do you think you know where it is yet...?


Ian McL

said about: The Great Glasgow Pie Hunt & Quiz

Should the answer be in the clues list?


Lesley Paterson

said about: The Garden

Two sad people in a sad little flat. Who cared when they finally managed a productive conversation even if it was only to finish all the pills! Was this play meant to represent our governmental agencies who meet frequently on committees and sub committees to con the public that something good is coming out of the talks? Best thing from the play was the apple tree.... and they killed it.


Terrymac

said about: Weekly Critics Circle Competition Winner

I have only one wee comment on Anthony Twist's review of 'Battery Farm'. The Oran Mor is in Glesga innat.No gie us a wee clue whit the hell yer talkin' aboot, Jimmy!


A

said about: The Great Glasgow Pie Hunt & Quiz

Keep doing it . Great !


admin

said about: And the winner is...

Thank you Douglas! Unfortunately no free pie, however if you team your excellent punctuation with a good review of the play for our Critics’ Circle, you could be in for a chance of getting a free bottle of Malt! Hope you enjoy the show.


Douglas Clark

said about: And the winner is...

"..if you're coming along..." not "your".Can I have a free pie on Saturday 13th for sorting out your punctuation;-)


Jen B.

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Nonetheless we will be back!


Jen B.

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

'Heaven' Not the best play at triple P.


Gerard Francis

said about: Crunch

Critics' Circle Review: No two performances of 'Crunch' are exactly the same. Such is the way of things when pastoral oratory meets stand up comedy. The essence of the play was inadvertently revealed by a member of Thursday's audience who piped up in indignation that instead of eliciting money for shredding purposes, the actor (because let's remember we were in a theatre) should ask instead for a £5 donation to charity. Through this outburst, the dénouement became clear: expressing horror at the destruction of a piece of paper was the perfect illustration of our love affair with money in its most devastating guise.


colin bulloch

said about: Crunch

play which exudes "le crunch"[golden,delicious with bite}"critics'circle review" audience participation; abridged evolution of mankind from hunter/gatherers via bartering to complex economic systems.the man in black convinces/compells the audience to join him on his whirlwind explanation of his five step theory of belief in money/richism.a solo performance to match that of any wild west snake-oil salesman.he reveals to all assembled how can behave like sheep blindly following or even lemming -like in our urge to do his bidding.music,Dire Straits,Stereophonics,Darwin,economics,bidding,greed,jealousy and psycology interact in this


Chris Smith

said about: Crunch

First visit to 'A Play,a pie and a pint', always fancied going, what would it be like?Had a drink in the bar before the show to assess the vibe and dug the chilled atmosphere - and enjoyed reading about future plays. Hope it's good. I battered my melt in to earn the right to go. I broke my tibia late 2008, am 44 in April and played football for 90 minutes Saturday past.Anyhow Gary McNair's utopian, Glaswegian, machiavellian, richism (I'm after the malt!)play and way did not disappoint - the guy had the audience in his pocket throughout.(99)


Alasdair Kelly

said about: For the love of money. Or maybe not...

Really liked Gary's performance - as someone who presents personal development sessions myself I found his delivery strangely familiar! The content was entertaining throughout however the ending, ironically, was not sufficiently on the money.


Peter Griffin

said about: For the love of money. Or maybe not...

Critic's Circle Review A winning performance from Gary McNair,his character, a cross between Rodney Trotter and Jonathon Ross easily seduced the OM regulars. Having said that, I felt that some of his interaction with the audience was simply padding out a rather clever sketch.When it comes to the crunch I think 'Crunch' would benefit greatly from a minor rewrite.Nevertheless,its still well worth the admission money and if you are in luck Gary might even give you your money back.


Susan Porteous

said about: The Secret Commonwealth

Having been transported into that place where the "real world" meets the unknown by a beautifully written and beautifully acted play, The Secret Commonwealth, I cannot agree with those who find the play irrelevant to today. I can only mourn what we have lost in our age of so-called civilisation.


cameron mcdougall

said about: For the love of money. Or maybe not...

Have just got home from seeing Crunch---gary Mc Nair was excellent as an American evangelist preaching his Richism philosophy-----hugely entertaining and thought provoking! I ALMOST got my wallet out ?


Terry Mc Fadden

said about: Crunch

CRUNCH. This one man tour de dorce was like attending one of those early American sales courses which demanded continuous inter-action and participation from those present. The pacey, thought-provoking dialogue, which, on the face of it, seemed only to poke gentle fun at our financial institutions, still managed to leave the audience with a few alarm bells ringing in their sub conscious minds. Great theatre!


George Cameron

said about: Crunch

Critics' Circle review What will we do for money, and could we live without it? Gary McNair tries to convince us we can. Dressed in Black and Gold with £10 in top pocket McNair delivers a lecture like performance on our belief in money. With interaction, McNair takes the audience though our inner greed whether bidding for an undisclosed amount or trading a jumper for actions! Could you really shred your hard earned cash? He convinces some they can! Go along and liberate yourself! This show is well worth the tenner!!


Julie Logan

said about: The Secret Commonwealth

The Secret Commonwealth is a play imagined in the modern day that simultaneously predates and postdates the preoccupation with the divided self that exists in Scottish literature. Robert Kirk personifies the Caledonian antisyzygy as he struggles through life wrestling with the pull of the new world and the allure of the old. There are times when the monologue almost slips into the realms of becoming a glorified storytelling exercise. However it is saved from this by the performance of Brennan and works best as a piece of drama when Robert's words are set against the evocative singing of Deirdre Graham.


John McDonald

said about: The Secret Commonwealth

"Critics' Circle Review" The Secret Commonwealth confirms that Brigadoon is alive and well. A solo performance is always challenging. Liam Brennan paced about in his elasticated waist trousers in a manner reminiscent of Jack Sparrow, shouting his lines with gusto. The Highland Scenario was laden with pseudo scottish cliches, from oatcakes to heather honey; disappointing that Tannochbrae didn't get a mention. Deirdre Graham's lone voice was haunting, although at times The White Heather Club would have better suited the genre. As a portrait of 17th Century highland life the play verges on the comedic


Critics' Circle Review

said about: The Secret Commonwealth

Why should you go to see a play about a seventeenth century Scottish minister in a remote Highland village? Well - because it isn't about those things, but about what lies beyond them on the edges, the margins, where languages, cultures and traditions collide and melt, reality isn't reliable and nothing is what it seems. I wasn't at all put off by the one-person monologue form: the speeches were so powerful and mesmerising I was as entranced as the poor minister himself. The acting was great and the whole thing worked. Quite enjoyed the pie too.


Chris

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Hi Edith, Could you not see the videos? Apologies about that. Very odd. I've just checked the videos and site on several different browsers, and on two separate computers/internet connections, and they are playing fine. Maybe you could try another computer? Or you could try our youtube channel and see if that works out for you. It's at http://www.youtube.com/PlayPiePintatOranMor Let me know if this helps you out! Thanks, Chris


Edith Smith

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Dissapointed as I could not get into see the interviews with Colin beattie, Ian Black, and david Hayman. However I am looking forward to this years plays. Edith.


William Livie

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Been to one of the plays on a visit to Glasgow earlier in the year. I really enjoyed the play that was on, and also the pint. I didn't really enjoy the pie though but apart from that, a really enjoyable hour.


Kyle MacRae

said about: Competition Time!

Competition over, folks. Thanks for your fantastic entries. Louise Stewart scooped the jackpot with "A Burns, a Bridie and a Buckie" :-)


Harry Kelly

said about: Competition Time!

A show, some scran an' a snifter.


Bronagh Bell

said about: Competition Time!

a soiree, sarnie and swalley a blether, a blinis and a bevvy.


Kirstie Swain

said about: Competition Time!

A Panto, a Pasty and a Pinot Grigio A Story, a Stovie and a Swift One. A Fable, a Feed and a Firewater A Tragedy, a Tart and a Tennant's. An Act, an Aliment and an'Alf


alister

said about: Competition Time!

lunch, lager and lovies! beer, bangers and brecht! chekov, chardonnay and cheese! Port, pasta and panto


Stevie

said about: Competition Time!

A Stringberg, some stovies and some Stella


Heather

said about: Competition Time!

A Lochhead, a Lorne sausage & a Lager A McGrath, a McDonald & a McEwans


Robert

said about: Competition Time!

a laugh, a langoustine and a large Glenfarclas


Gerard Connolly

said about: A Christmas Carol

A very enjoyable show, but did not have the laughs of last year. Bound to happen I guess, but worth seeing. I look forward to the 2010 production.


Laura P

said about: Competition Time!

A Burlesque, a baguette and a brew!


Laura P

said about: Competition Time!

A matinee, macaroni and a mixer!


@FreeRangeHaggis

said about: Competition Time!

Panto, Pizza & Pinot Grigio


Amanda

said about: Competition Time!

A Scottish Play, A Scotch Pie, A Scotch Whisky


Jennie

said about: Competition Time!

A Berkoff, a Biriani and a Beck's A Webster, a Watermelon and a WKD A Dorfman, a dumpling and a double(of whatever you're having....) now I must go and do some w*rk


uberVU - social comments

said about: Competition Time!

Social comments and analytics for this post... This post was mentioned on Twitter by PlayPiePint: It's competition time. Come up with the best aliteration and win 2 of the hottest tickets in town http://bit.ly/8jdRSi please RT...


Craig Glover

said about: Competition Time!

A Farce, a Fish and a Fosters A Musical, a Munch and a Midori A Cabaret, a Croissant and a Campari A Revue, a Ravioli and a Rum A Chekov, a Chomp and a Cheeky Vimto


Amanda

said about: Competition Time!

A Tale, Tatties and a Tipple


Grant

said about: Competition Time!

A William, a Waffle and a Whiskey A Russell, Rhubarb and a Russian A Gilbert, a Goulash and a Guiness :)


Louise Stewart

said about: Competition Time!

A Burns, A Bridie and a Buckie


Bronagh Bell

said about: Competition Time!

A poem, a poke and a port


Caron Stewart

said about: Competition Time!

a soap a shrimp and a shandy (for westenders)


Hollie Miller

said about: Competition Time!

Shakespeare, shallots and a sherry


Karen Bartke

said about: Competition Time!

A Shakespeare, a sausage and a snifter


Hollie Miller

said about: Competition Time!

A Burns, a banana and a brew


Michelle

said about: Competition Time!

How about, A Shakespeare, a shandy and a shag? Clearly a shag isn't food, but if music be the food of love, and all that... Forgive the "Brazen" approach, but it's what we do best.


Bronagh Bell

said about: Competition Time!

A Bard, A Blinis and a Buckfast.


Lesley Judge

said about: Competition Time!

A Midsummer Night's Dream, a Meringue and a Midori A Cervantes, a Cheese sandwich, and a Cerveza A Beckett, a Bhuna and a Bacardi and coke A Pinter, Pork Scratchings and a Pina Colada


Allan Carroll

said about: WestEnders Ends Tonight

I'm going to miss this series - it's been such a laugh! Can you promise me it will be back?!


Chris

said about: Panto Reviews

Hi Hilary! Glad you had fun at the panto and i'm over the moon that you've finally found us after all these years! Incidentally (as a native of the Southern lands), if you're keen on honing your skills for the local dialects of Scotland check out the wee video of Ian Black on our site here. Ian comes to every single one of our plays (and is often found in the bar area afterward), he wrote the book "Edinbuggers vs Weegies" so is somewhat an authority in Scottish slang - next time you're down introduce yourself and i'm sure he'll be more than happy to take you through any Glasgae words that you need clarification on!


hilary smith

said about: Panto Reviews

Attended panto today- 1st time at Oran Mor and it was an extremely entertaining experience!I loved the humour typically Glaswegian and as an anglo-saxon even understood it!! I would have no hesitation in recommending the concept and am amazed having lived in Glasgow for 9yrs it must be the best kept secret ever!!! I will be back!


Tweets that mention A Play, a Pie and a Pint » Blog Archive » A Christmas Carol -- Topsy.com

said about: A Christmas Carol

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Bagging Scotland and Play Pie Pint, Play Pie Pint. Play Pie Pint said: @BaggingScotland Glad you enjoyed the panto at the Citz at the weekend. Fancy another one? http://bit.ly/7eT5qD [...]


Chris

said about: Panto Reviews

Thanks Catriona and Robert for coming along to the show and glad you had fun! Sorry to hear about the lift incident Robert, I hope you weren't stuck in there for too long!


Robert Colquhoun

said about: Panto Reviews

This was our first ever visit. We thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience. The panto was very funny and we laughed out loud many times. Even getting stuck in the lift afterwards didn't lessen the enjoyment of the day.


Catriona Campbell

said about: Panto Reviews

Excellent entertainment, really appreciated the effort the cast put into the show.


Kyle MacRae

said about: A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Are you same Ian Black I bumped into in a pub in Tobermory about 8 years ago? You spotted me as a fellow journalist because I was a) sitting alone b) reading a book c) the book was by Martin Amis :)


Jill

said about: WestEnders - live soap opera

This is just such a great idea, can't wait for the next episode


Stacey

said about: Behind the scenes

sounds like a really great job Ronnie


Barry

said about: A Christmas Carol

Keith Warwick video is so funny


Amy

said about: A Christmas Carol

love the videos - can't wait to see the panto